"Low -Technology”: A Forgotten Sector in Innovation Policy

Hartmut Hirsch-Kreinsen

Abstract


Abstract In the discussions on research and technology policy focuses mainly on the dynamic innovation of new technologies. Long term growth, competitive advantages on the world market and employment effects are primarily perceived in new high-tech products. According to this perspective the question as to the future of industrial sectors that produce mature and conventional standard products is not raised at all. Such industrial sectors are, following well-known OECD categories, regarded as "low-tech". However, there are a number of convincing examples of sectors and companies that have been successfully inno-vating low tech products in “high-tech countries” of the European Union.The paper focuses on low-tech companies analysing their innovative capabilities and developmental perspectives. The argumentation is based on results of a recently finished research project on the developmental perspectives of low-tech industries funded by the European Commission (project title: „Policy and Innovation in Low-tech Indus-tries in Europe – PILOT“).

Keywords


low-technology industrial innovations, innovation system, industrial development

Full Text:

PDF [en]

References


ENDER, G.; Laestadius, S. (2005). Non-science based innovativeness: on capabilities relevant to generate profitable novelty In: Bender, G.;Jacobson, D.; Robertson, P. (eds.), Non-Research-Intensive Industries in the Knowledge Economy. Special Issue of Perspectives on Economic, Political and Social Integration, Catholic University, Lublin/PL, pp. 123-170

BENDER,G.;Jacobson, D.; Robertson, R (eds.) (2005). Non-Research-lntensive Industries in the Knowledge Economy. Special Issue of Perspectives on Economic, Political and Social Integration, Catholic University, Lublin/PL

COHEN,W. M., Levinthal, D.A. (1990). Absorptive Capacity.A New Perspective on Learning and Innovation. Administrative Science Quarterly, 35 (I), pp. 128-152.

FAULKNER,W; Senker,J.;Velho, L (1995). Knowledge Frontiers, Oxford.

FOSS, N. (1997). Resources, Firms and Strategies -A Reader in the Resource-Based Perspective, Oxford.

HENDERSON, R. M.; Clark, K B. (1990).Architectural Innovation: The Reconfiguration of Existing ProductTechnologies and the Failure of Established Firm. Administrative Science Quarterly, 35 (1),pp.9-30

HIRSCH-KREINSEN, H.;Jacobson, D. (eds.) (2008). Innovation in Low-Tech Firms and Industries. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar (forthcoming)

HIRSCH-KREINSEN, H.;Jacobson, D.; Robertson, P.L. (2006). "Low-Tech' Industries": Innovativeness and Development Perspectives -A Summary of a European Research Project. In: Prometheus, March, pp. 3-21

JACOBSON, D.; Heanue, K. (2005). Policy conclusions and recommendations. In: Bender, G.;Jacobson, D.; Robertson, R (eds.), Non-Research-Intensive Industries in the Knowledge Economy Special Issue of Perspectives on Economic, Political and Social Integration, Catholic University, Lublin/PL, pp. 259-416

KALOUDIS,A; Sandven J.; Smith, K. (2005). Structural change, growth and innovation: the roles of medium and low-tech industries 1980-2000. In: Bender, G.;Jacobson, D.; Robertson, R (eds.), Non-Research-Intensive Industries in the Knowledge Economy. Special Issue of Perspectives on Economic, Political and Social Integration, Catholic University, Lublin/PL, pp. 49-74

KLINE, S.J.; Rosenberg, N.(1986). An overview of innovation. In: Landau, R.; Rosenberg, N. (eds.),The Positive Sum Strategy - HarnessingTechnology for Economic Growth,Washington, pp. 275-305

MASKELL, R (1998). Learning in the village economy of Denmark: the role of institutions and policy in sustaining competitiveness. In: Braczyk, H.-J., Cooke, R, Heidenreich, M. (eds.), Regional Innovation Systems, London, pp. 190-213

MENDONÇA, S.;Tunzelmann, von N. (2004). Brave oldWorld: Accounting for "High-Tech" Knowledge in "Low-Tech" Industries. Paper presented at the DRUID's Summer Conference"Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development" Copenhagen, Denmark june 14-16

OECD (1997). Proposed Guidelines for Collecting and InterpretingTechnological Innovation Data - the Oslo Manual. Paris

OECD (2002). Frascati Manual. Proposed Standard for Surveys on Research and Experimental Development. Sixth revision, Paris

OECD (2005). Science,Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2005, Paris

PALMBERG, C. (2001). Sectoral patterns of innovation and competence requirements - a closer look at low-tech industries. Sitra Report Series No. 8, Helsinki

PENROSE, E. (1959). The Theory ofthe Growth of the Firm. 3rd ed., Oxford

PRAHALAD, C. K; Hamel, G. (1990).The core competence of the corporation. In: Harvard business Review. 68 (3), pp. 79-91

ROBERTSON, Paul L./Parimal R. Patel (2007). New Wine in Old Bottles - Technological Diffusion in Developed Economies. In: Research Policy, 36, pp. 708 - 721

ROBERTSON, R L; Smith, K (2008).Technological Upgrading and Distributed Knowledge Bases. In: Hirsch-Kreinsen, H.;Jacobson, D (eds.): Innovation in Low-tech Firms and Industries, Cheltenham (forthcoming)

SCHMIERL, K. (ed.) (2000). Intelligente Produktion einfacher Pro-dukte am Standort Deutschland. Frankfurt/NewYork

TEECE, D.J.; Pisano, G. (1994).The Dynamic Capabilities of Firms: an Introduction. In: Industrial and Corporate Change, 3 (3), pp. 537-556

TEECE, D.J.; Pisano, G.; Shuen,A (1997). Dynamic Capabilities and Strategic Management. In: Strategic Management Journal, 18 (7), pp. 509-533

The Economist (1998).The strange life of low-tech America. October 17th, pp. 85-86

TUNZELMANN, von N.;Acha,V. (2005). Innovation in "Low-Tech" Industries. In: Fagerberg, J.; Mowery, D.C.; Nelson, R.R. (eds.),The Oxford Handbook of Innovation, Oxford, pp. 407-432




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0718-27242008000100002



Copyright (c)



2017 © Universidad Alberto Hurtado - Facultad de Economía y Negocios. 
Erasmo Escala 1835 - Santiago, Chile.
Economic Analysis Review | Observatorio Económico | Gestión y Tendencias 

Journal Supported by Chimera Innova Group